Sword Songs     The Black Brigade     Poetcetera
     
  THE IDEOLOGY
  THE BIOGRAPHY
  BIOGRAPHY UPDATE #1
  BIOGRAPHY UPDATE #2
  BIOGRAPHY UPDATE #3
  BIOGRAPHY UPDATE #4
  PHOTO GALLERY
  THE ARTICLES
  THE POETRY
  THE SPEECHES
 

THE INTERVIEWS

  THE ARTWORK
  THE MUSIC
  THE BOOKSTORE
 

THE BLACK BRIGADE

  HOMEPAGE
  GET Home
   
 

EMAIL
George Edward Tait

Available for Bookings

 


Art-Alive.com

 

 

‘THE LITTLE TREE GROWIN’
IN THE SHADE’ HAS ROOTS IN FAMILY

      

     Camille Yarbrough’s book is a compact opus of concentrated truth creatively camouflaged as a work of fiction.  It is, moreover, a multi-faceted and multi-dimensional work that is as entertaining as it is educational.

     First and foremost, Yarbrough has written an Afrikan family story which focuses on the functional interaction of three generations residing in a single household.  These principle characters are clearly defined and concisely described with their dialogue and actions accurately depicted according to age, awareness and attitude.  The realism of Yarbrough’s portrayals makes her characters not only instantly recognizable but, ultimately, representational.

     In addition, she achieves an equilibrium of extended family expression throughout the balanced treatment of each family member.  “Mama,” “Daddy,” “Brother,” “Sister,” “Great-Grammaw,” and the 96 year old “adopted” elder, Mr. Witherspoon, are presented with refreshing wholesomeness  without sacrificing verisimilitude.

     Secondly, “The Little Tree Growin’ In The Shade” serves as a book of historical significance.  Utilizing a “wheel within the wheel” technique, Yarbrough skillfully incorporates a slave narrative sequence as the centerpiece of “History” to render unto the reader a docu-dramatization of an Afrikan proverb from which the book title is derived. After the narrative chronicles the birth, glory and fragmentation of Afrikan civilization, the transportation of Afrikan behavior patterns from the homeland to the Diaspora is related with remarkable insight and intensity.

     Thirdly, on a musicological note, Yarbrough’s book is a story of the spiritual song, tracing its roots in Afrika to its role in slavery.  The significance of sound augmented by the magic of music and words is given extended coverage.

     Fourthly, it is a book of spirituality, clarifying the connection between traditional
Afrikan religion and Christianity in its modified manifestation.  The book projects spirituality as the ultimate powerbase of Afrikan people and a continuous source of strength.

     It is Yarbrough’s seasoned and superior skill as a storyteller that enabled her to effectively mold this multi-leveled material into a literary masterpiece of simplicity, substance, and style; it is her life and lifestyle, however, that loads this literary work with authenticity.  Her erudition extends author into author-ity.

     “The Little Tree Growin’ in the Shade” is superbly illustrated by Tyrone Geter.  His amazing artwork accompanies the storyline with symbolic sensitivity.  Whereas Yarbrough utilizes language like a master painter with an arsenal of brushstrokes and colors to convey the appropriate meaning and mood.  Geter uses art like a master writer empowering every image with literary dimension.

     It is, finally, a book of survival.  One understands that Afrikan people have a choice:  To be a little tree growing in the shade of diasporic darkness or a big tree growing in the sun of Afrika.

Publication Name: NEW YORK AMSTERDAM NEWS

 
+